Ethical Wildlife Tourism and Responsible Wildlife Experiences

Tenikwa Code of Conduct

Tenikwa believes in ethical wildlife tourism and adheres to a strict code of conduct to ensure that visitors are afforded a safe, conservation-based wildlife experience whilst adhering to global animal welfare standards

  • Prior to each program, visitors attend a safety briefing to explain what will happen on the program and how to behave in the close proximity to wildlife.
  • Animal Husbandry is of an international standard, ensuring that animals have readily access to fresh water and are fed a varied diet to maintain full health and vigour.
  • Animal enclosures represent species-specific habitat and the animals are free to express natural behaviour in the enclosures and are free to seek shelter.
  • Tenikwa animals are cared for by a professional veterinarian and full time veterinary nurse as well as a team of dedicated, experienced animal keepers and feeders who are employed on a full time basis.
  • The level of interaction with humans is strictly controlled and appropriate to the program.
  • The breeding of wild animal is not one of Tenikwa’s stated objectives.
  • Animals used to conduct awareness programs are captive-bred and will live out the rest of their natural lives at Tenikwa.
  • The time that our cheetahs spend out in their extended territory is scheduled to co-incide with the naturally active time of cheetahs in the wild.
  • Animals in the Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre are not exhibited to the public.
  • Our souvenir shop does not stock curios made from wildlife-products, and as a Fair Trade accredited member, we actively source locally-made products and promote hand-made crafts and community initiatives.

Animal Contact Policy

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Wild animals used on our consrevation awareness programs were born in captivity and are non-releasable. They are entirely dependent on us for their physical and mental well-being. The ability for us to handle our animals greatly assists with animal husbandry, especially routine treatments, early detection of illness, reduction in stress when they need to be medicated and for palliative care as they grow older.

Tenikwa supports an ethical, controlled, safe and natural wildlife experience and believes that physical contact with the animals by guests is not necessary or essential for us to achieve our objectives of conservation education and awareness.

At Tenikwa we do offer our visitors an experience with our animals in their natural surroundings which is enjoyable, informative and does not impose on the welfare of our animals. Our visitors have the amazing opportunity to enter some of our animals enclosures with our trained guides, providing them with the opportunity to take exquisite pictures. Tenikwa does not allow guests to touch our Wild Cats during any program.

Tenikwa will continually evaluate the nature of our programs to determine whether they are contributing to the objectives of our centre and the well-being of our animals.

RESPONSIBLE TOURISM REPORT 2018

It is with a sense of achievement that we publish our Responsible Tourism Report for 2018, highlighting the improvements and initiatives during the year, reflecting the continued commitment towards responsible tourism principles.

Our first year of Fair Trade Tourism accreditation has brought a renewed commitment towards responsible tourism principles. We have risen to the challenges faced, as only the Tenikwa team can, adapting to the changing tourism environment whilst maintaining continuity and business sustainability.

Fair Trade Tourism released their Captive Animal Guidelines and we were pleased to see that Tenikwa achieved a very high level of compliancy with only a few adjustments to make.

The idea to develop a replacement program for the Cheetah Walk was initiated in 2017 with our cheetahs entering a more sedentary phase of their life-age, and this together with industry pressure resulted in the conceptual design for the new program called “Wild Ways”. The logistics and tour content was formulated once we were satisfied that we had a program that would be enjoyable, educational and value for money for the guests, but also allow the cheetahs their time out and meet the expectations of the tourism industry for a responsible program.

It was important to incorporate local history, cultural and environmental principles into the program, and we achieved this with the concept and construction of the walkways, boma and lapa, and tour content, utilising the kraaling techniques of the Zulu tribes to keep their live stock safe from predators, and a nature walk showcasing the biodiversity of the Cape Floral Fynbos on the property.

The program is evidence of Tenikwa’s continual strive towards sustainability and our willingness to adapt to change without compromising our animal husbandry principles.

Our journey towards sustainability as an organisation:

In 2011, we embarked on an informal program to “put into practice what it preaches” ensuring that the impact of the business on the environment was understood and measures taken to reduce the impact where possible.

In 2012, we formalised our journey towards sustainability by becoming an accredited and audited silver-level Greenline member of the HeritageSA program.

2013-2014 saw the consolidation our activities into core objectives as an organisation. Some ineffective programs were discontinued and we launched the successful EcoKidz Family Challenge, delivering a value-added product with specific conservation objectives.

In 2015, we re-assessed the effectiveness of our community engagement to achieve our objectives of encouraging a behavioural change in lifestyle to a more environmentally-sensitive way of living. Significant strides towards reducing our energy consumption were made and our overall conservation efforts and holistic approach to supporting biodiversity have been recognised in various spheres.

2016 saw a concerted effort to upgrade our rehabilitation facilities with the complete overhaul of our marine pool and adapting our facilities to the changing conservation needs of The Garden Route. Conventional lighting was fully converted to LED and we improved our rainwater holding capacity significantly.

In 2017, celebrating our 10th Anniversary in Conservation Awareness, our efforts were focussed to rapidly adapt to meet global animal welfare best practice and evolving trends in tourism in terms of captive wildlife. Faced with an increasing drought situation, water security was high priority.

Conservation awareness is one of the core pillars of the Tenikwa conservation philosophy and we have reached 22,184 guests in 2018 exposing them to responsible tourism practices as well as conservation issues in South Africa.

Employees

To thank the staff for their effort over the busy season, we held a “Celebrate your culture” braai for the staff. The organisation structure was changed in June to incorporate an experienced management couple based on the property. The mobile clinic from Kurland Village was made available to the staff periodically for primary health care needs. The employee numbers averaged 30 permanent staff members for the year. Tenikwa does not make use of volunteers to assist with animal husbandry or rehabilitation preferring to contribute towards employment in the area. In June, we assessed and adjusted staff salaries to be in line with the 2018 Minimum Wages agreement for the hospitality industry.

The Vet Skills Program saw several veterinary students stay at Tenikwa and become exposed to dealing with wildlife injuries and rehabilitation protocols, and we trust that these skills will be useful in their future veterinary careers.

Wildlife Rehabilitation

372 admissions were received in 2018. Tenikwa has developed a good working relationship with the various veterinary and conservation bodies that operate in The Garden Route, and work together to ensure that birds and animals in need are assessed, collected and transported.

Rehabilitation Services offered to the community

2017

2018

Animals/Birds admitted to our Rehabilitation Facilities

303

372

A breakdown of admissions reflect the biodiversity of the region:

African Penguins 67

Other marine birds 67

Marine Mammals 7

Marine Turtles 7

Raptors & Owls 3

Other terrestrial birds 147

Small Mammals 25

Large Mammals 8

Tortoises & Reptiles 39 * significant increase due to fires

Exotics 4

African Penguin Releases in conjunction with our conservation partners, provide a rare opportunity for us to involve the greater Plettenberg Bay community in our rehabilitation work. Not only does it serve as a reminder that African Penguins occur along our coastline and when they come ashore along The Garden Route, they are in need of assistance, it also provides an opportunity to expose the community to the work that Tenikwa does. In 2018, 8 African Penguin Release events were organised with a total of 40 penguins being released during the period. In total, 164 animals were released or held over for release in 2018.

Tenikwa hosted Two Oceans Aquarium’s turtle stranding workshop for authorities and NGO’s involved in conservation. The training session exposed attendees to stranding protocols and dealing effectively with strandings. Beside Tenikwa staff, 35 people attended the workshop, including staff from CapeNature, SANParks, Natures Valley Trust and Orca Foundation.

Energy Management

Improvements made during the year included the extension of our Leopard enclosure, the electrification of which is run by solar. The lion enclosure was also converted to solar. This, together with a concerted effort to reduce mainstream electricity demand on the property, resulted in a significant improvement in electricity costs.

2017

2018

Electricity consumption

29,381kwh

21,887kwh

Electricity spend

R66,422.41

R46,243.83

Electricity spend per guest head

R2,71

R2,08

Alternative energy spend

R17,124.16

R10,559.50

Waste Management

The arrangement we have with the a local company to collect our recyclable waste for recovery is working well. This year has seen a slight decrease in our recyclable waste. Staff are allowed to take recyclable waste for recycle recovery community projects:

2017

2018

Tin / Glass

647.44kg

267kg

Paper / Cardboard

954.17kg

1056kg

Plastic

440.91kg

617.70kg

2042.52Kg

1940.7kg

Responsible Spend

Because we believe in supporting local, small and environmentally friendly businesses, we made extra effort this year to buy responsibly. Analysing our purchases, Tenikwa’s responsible spending equated to 38% of all spend.

2017

2018

Local/SMME/Environmentally friendly/Fair Trade spend

R2,311,350

R1,889,774

Water Management

Our investment in water catchment made in 2017 was put to good use in 2018, and we will continue to increase our storage capacity. There was an increase in rainwater usage in the marine pool, as african penguins now stay longer whilst they are being prepared for release, and water quality during this period had to be maintained.

2017

2018

Water Consumption in Litres

1919196

1742925

Water Consumption per guest head

78.56

78.23

Social Responsibility

Most of our social responsibility efforts were focused in developing a relationship with the Kurland Edu-Center in Kurland Village. In discussion with the principal on their needs, we arranged for our maintenance team to cut the grass in the play area on a regular basis. We also discussed the revitalising of their vegetable patch for the school to be self-sufficient and grow their own veggies, so the little ones can have a wholesome meal every day. We reached out to our suppliers, schools and guests, and through them were able to supply the following items to the creche:

100 puzzles and 30 story books

Soft toys and Toy sets

6kg crayons, 50 colouring pens, 50 kokis, 2 boxes of stationary

30 story books

R1500 worth of Educational supplies

Sweets and noodles

Gently used childrens clothing

Toiletries

Financial Management

It is important that Tenikwa operates with a conservative financial approach. Not only are we operating in a changing global and local environment with a tight economy, we have to ensure, as a registered rehabilitation centre, that there are contingency funds available to cover ecological disasters , such as oil spills, fires, etc.

Allocation of Expenses

2019 and the way forward

As South Africa struggles to remain competitive as a global and attractive tourist destination of choice, Tenikwa has had to deal with several hard-hitting challenges simultaneously. Not only has the impact of Day Zero in Cape Town had a ripple effect on tourism numbers along The Garden Route, Tenikwa has had to deal with the consequences of tour operators removing captive wildlife activities from scheduled tours until the industry produces self-regulation guidelines which have taken far too long to develop. As a non-profit organisation operating in a competitive tourism environment, Tenikwa continually has to balance a meaningful guest experience which imparts a conservation message whilst providing a sustainable form of funding for the rehabilitation associated activities of the organisation. The cost of constantly having to adapt and change our tourism offering has significantly increased our operating costs and this has to be dealt with in 2019 where tourism arrival projections are showing decline in most target markets. To this end, we foresee that 2019 will be a year in which we streamline high fixed costs and look for opportunities where we can develop longer-term income streams which will allow us to continue to be a meaningful and mindful employer in the area and carry out the conservation activities to meet the objectives of the organisation.

Annual Responsible Tourism Report 2017

Offering ethical conservation-based conservation programs, guests visiting Tenikwa have the chance to learn about South African Indigenous Wild Cats in an environment which emulates natural habitat. We use Tourism as a platform to raise awareness about the indigenous wildlife and factors causing their decline, utilising the funds for rehabilitating and returning animals to the wild where they belong.

In 2011, Tenikwa embarked on an informal program to “put into practice what it preached” through ensuring that the impact of the business on the environment was understood and measures taken to reduce the impact where possible.

In 2012, Tenikwa formalised its journey towards measurability of its sustainability by becoming members of HeritageSA, and through the Greenline Program, underwent a self-assessment and subsequent audit of its business processes, acquiring Silver-level accreditation status.

2013-2014 saw us consolidating our activities and taking stock of what our core objectives are and where we should be placing our focus. Some ineffective programs were discontinued and we launched the successful EcoKidz Family Challenge which has had great acceptance in the marketplace, delivering a value-added product with specific conservation objectives and geared towards the family with 7-12 age group children.

In 2015, we re-assessed the effectiveness of our community engagement to achieve our objectives of encouraging a behavioural change in lifestyle to a more environmentally-sensitive way of living. We made significant strides towards reducing our energy consumption and focused on integrating rehabilitation awareness into our general awareness programs. Our overall conservation efforts and holistic approach to supporting biodiversity have been recognised in various spheres.

2016 saw a concerted effort to upgrading our rehabilitation facilities with the complete overhaul of our marine pool and adapting our facilities to the changing conservation needs of The Garden Route. We completed the conversion of our lighting systems to LED throughout the property and we improved our rainwater holding capacity significantly. We also upgraded several enclosures to use the Awareness Centre more effectively to deliver messages of modern day use of technology in non-lethal methods of predator management. Working closely with other conservation stakeholders, we focused on increasing local awareness of our wildlife rehabilitation facilities to ensure that animals in need are brought to the centre as soon and as efficiently as possible to afford maximum chance of recovery and release.

Celebrating 10 years in Conservation Awareness, Tenikwa continues to Empower, Educate and Rehabilitate; and our activities of 2017 are evidence of our conservation philosophy in practice.

In 2017, our main focus revolved around the adaptation of our awareness programs to meet global animal welfare best practice and evolving trends in tourism in terms of captive wildlife. In terms of this, we took the decision to apply for Fair Trade Tourism Certification and were proud to achieve this in August. Faced with an increasing drought situation, it was imperative that we addressed water security and quality for the facility, and many of the interventions implemented during 2017 revolved around water management.

Energy Management 2017

Over the years a lot of changes were made to operations of both the Awareness and Rehabilitation Centre.

  • The project to switch over to LED lighting throughout Tenikwa was completed.

  • Room heaters in the hospital high care have been replaced by heating lamps where critical, and hot water bottles for less critical patients.

  • The Penguin Pool pump runs on solar which has reduced energy consumption

  • Laptops and electronic devices are switched off and unplugged when not in use.

  • Gas cooking is implemented for our Chesters Coffee Shop.

The increased admissions of turtles to our Rehabilitation Centre has increased energy consumption through the heating requirements, and this is an area that needs to be addressed in the future. Although significant changes to reduce cost and manage the use of energy has been introduced; our annual spend is still too high and this is as a result of the rising cost of electricity as well as an expanding facility

2016

2017

Electricity Consumption

29231 KwH

29381 KwH

Electricity Spend

R73377.67

R66422.41

Electricity Spend Per Guest Head

R3.18

R2.71

Alternative Energy Spend

R22423.00

R17124.16

Increase/Decrease Comments: 9.48% decrease in electricity spend

23.63% decrease in alternative energy spend

Waste Management

Throughout our years in operation, Tenikwa has always been waste conscious and we have separation bins throughout the facility to recover recyclable waste.

  • In the past years, we had an arrangement with Kurland Recycle Swop Shop where our recyclable waste was utilised to purchase commodity items for the community. This program closed down and we have subsequently made an arrangement with a local community business to collect recyclable waste for recovery.

  • Compass Medical Waste is responsible for the removal of all our biohazardous and medical waste and animal carcasses are incinerated.

  • Animal Waste (faeces) is collected on a daily basis from animal enclosures and the rehabilitation hospital; this is then put into our newly installed digester. Biological Enzymes are added on a weekly basis to break the matter down and eliminate odour.

2016

2017

Recyclable Waste : Tin/glass

667.38 kg

647.44 kg

Recyclable Waste : Paper/Cardboard

1044.73 kg

954.17 kg

Recyclable Waste : Plastic

775.95 kg

440.91 kg

Increase/Decrease Comment: 17.91% decrease in recyclable waste from 2016 to 2017

Water Management

One of the main focus areas in 2017 was water security, availability and quality. Tenikwa has no access to a municipal water supply system and is reliant on rain water storage, dams and furrow water.

  • Tenikwa has significantly increased its rainwater storage capacity and converted the Awareness Centre onto rainwater.

  • Several dams have also been cleared of papyrus which was choking the water systems.

  • The Marine Pool area has been completely overhauled with the re-lining of the penguin pool and upgrading of the areas surrounding the pool. This will allow more efficient water filtration and cleaning and reduce the need to change the water too often as well as excessive use of chemicals.

  • Following the devastating fires in June, the fire-readiness of the facility was evaluated, and additional fire-fighting equipment in terms of a Bakkie-Sakkie, Backpack Tanks, Protective Gear was purchased.

  • Extensive firebreaks were cleared around the perimeter fence and substantial amount of fire-loading dead vegetation was removed from the property.

  • The Alien Management Program remains active to reduce alien vegetation on the property.

2016

2017

Water Consumption (L)

1 855 585

1 919 196

Water Consumption per Guest Head (L)

80.54

78.23

Increase/Decrease Comment : 3.43% increase on water consumption, however there was a 6.49% increase in visitors to Tenikwa. Management of water resulted in a consumption per guest head reduction.

Community Engagement

Tenikwa provides a wildlife rehabilitation facility for res nullius animals and birds along The Garden Route who are abandoned, injured or in need of veterinary care. All admissions are treated free of charge. Assistance and advice is provided to the community who are dealing with damage causing animals. Our website has been redeveloped with the emphasis on providing information, guidance and direction for various human-wildlife conflict situations as well as advice for people encountering injured wildlife.

Rehabilitation Services offered to the community

2016

2017

Animals/Birds admitted to our Rehabilitation Facilities

253

303

Our long term affiliation with Natures Valley Trust, Cape Nature, South African National Parks and Birdlife South Africa delivered great success stories. Workshops hosted by Tenikwa for Wildlife First Responder Training was well supported by these organizations and the public.

Stakeholder Training 2017

Date

Attendees

First Responder Training (Wildlands)

4 May 2017

32

First Responder Training (CapeNature)

11 May 2017

5

First Responder Training (SANParks)

14 Nov 2017

11

The generous donation of clothes, shoes and games from one of our clients was the start of a very fruitful partnership between Tenikwa and the Kurland EduCare Centre. This centre is based in Kurland Village and accommodates on average 110 pupils from the disadvantaged community. The passion of staff is seen in their dedication by going the extra mile and buying supplies out of their own pocket at times so that the children can at least have one decent meal a day – for most, the only meal for the day.

Working with our suppliers, Tenikwa was able to assist the Centre with donations of food and beverage, cleaning materials, IT equipment and fundraising efforts.

The highlights for the Social Responsibility Department was working with the Kurland Edu Care on their annual Christmas pageant as well as the Bitou Family Care and CrossFitt Plett to make their “Blessing in a Box” campaign a success. This initiative aims to give kids from the Kurland Community a gift and something tasty to eat and drink on the day. The excitement on the faces of these kids when receiving gifts and singing along to Christmas Carols were overwhelming for Tenikwa. The event targeted 400 children and ended up catering for just short of 700.

Tenikwa has a purchasing policy which encourages the support of local businesses, environmentally responsible products and small entrepeneurs. We monitor our own purchases in an effort to make our own spend count in the right places.

Percentage

Rand Value

Tenikwa spend invested in local businesses, environmentally responsible products and small entrepreneurship

51%

R 2 311 350.00

Tenikwa believes that one of the core challenges facing conservation is overcoming the high levels of unemployment in South Africa. For this reason, Tenikwa does not offer a traditional volunteer program – preferring to employ permanent staff members to take care of the basic needs of the animals and skilled staff to work in the rehabilitation hospital. On our Vet Skills Program we consider requests for work experience for students studying towards a veterinary degree or diploma. Tenikwa provides a unique training ground for these students to gain experience not only in wildlife rehabilitation but also animal husbandry practices. Participants to the Vet Skills Program cover the basic costs of their upkeep and where possible donate a small amount of money per day towards the costs of the rehabilitation facility.

Staff Welfare

We engaged with various other stakeholders and organisations on staff welfare projects such as the Western Cape Dept. Health (Mobile Clinic Division) and the South African National Blood Service. During the visit of the Mobile Clinic Division our staff was encourage to go for screening and were educated on the dangers and treatment for TB, Diabetes, HIV/AIDS and STD’s. In doing these sessions, we were able to facilitate help for staff and their families that needed counselling. As important as these sessions are for the welfare of staff, it also helps with productivity of staff whilst on duty.

The work we do at Tenikwa goes beyond the call of duty and we are a dedicated team that works tirelessly to make sure that every client coming through our doors receive an outstanding experience. An experience that is conservation based, educational and ethical; friendly and not harmful to any of our animals or visitors. For this reason “A Night with the Stars” in celebration of Tenikwa’s 10 Years in Conservation was held and having CapeNature staff in attendance made this a special celebration. We are also proud to have awarded our Founders with an award for their unwavering support and unapologetic involvement in wildlife conservation and awareness, during the celebration.

Wildlife Rehabilitation

Undoubtedly, the highlight of 2017 was the first release of African Penguins in Plettenberg Bay for more than 10 years. In partnership with Natures Valley Trust and Birdlife SA, five endangered African Penguins that had been rehabilitated at Tenikwa were released at Look Out Beach. A second release later in the year followed on November 11th 2017. This release was attended by more than 500 spectators and received international media attention when the video was featured on National Geographic’s Facebook page and shared with their 45 million fans.

Turtles admission over the last few years have increased and through the collaborative efforts of CemAir, Tenikwa has been able to speedily get hatchlings through to Two Oceans Aquarium in Cape Town.

The devastating fires that swept through Knysna and Plettenberg Bay in June had a profound impact on wildlife. As expected, the delayed effect that these fires had on wildlife was experienced after the disaster when we started seeing a sharp increase in juvenile bird admissions, likely to the impact of habitat loss and food availability. Among the admissions we had baby tortoises that will be released in 2018 onto reserves whose tortoise populations decimated.

In December 2017, we had, for the first time in 10 years of rehabilitation, admitted two large rock monitors. The first one was driven over deliberately by a taxi. This was witnesses by our vet, who stopped and rescued the lizard and administered life-saving intervention. A week later, another lizard was admitted with similar injuries from the Willowmore area. After weeks of care and being kept under close observation, both these two lizards were successfully released.

Rehabilitation Admissions

2016

2017

African Penguins

33

38

Other Marine Birds

47

52

Marine Mammals

7

8

Marine Turtles

12

6

Raptors and Owls

4

6

Other Terrestrial Birds

115

133

Small Mammals

12

21

Large Mammals

10

3

Tortoises and other reptiles

7

29

Exotic animals and birds

4

5

Conservation Awareness

Advocating conservation awareness has always been the core function of Tenikwa’s awareness programs and we are mindful of the increased contentiousness of wild animals in captive environments. In January 2017 we modified our facility to allow our cheetahs to walk harness-free during their daily enrichment program, and at the same time, took the opportunity to re-evaluate some of the remaining programs which allowed a small element of controlled animal contact. From January 2017, guests were no longer allowed contact with the cheetahs during the walks, and later in the year we completely eliminated guest contact with the cats and Hazard Category 1 animals according to the ABTA Animal Welfare Guidelines. We were honored to receive our Fair Trade Tourism certification after a comprehensive and in-depth audit during August 2017, which validated that we are aligned with more than just the minimum and ethical practices and strive towards best practice.

In order for Tenikwa to receive the Fair Trade Tourism certification, we had to comply with 100% of FTT’s mandatory certification criteria. This accreditation was not only a milestone for us, but, recognition of the work we do as a Non Profit Organisation with the community; in our rehabilitation facility and our demonstrated support and contribution to biodiversity.

Through Tourism and the Conservation based programs that we run at Tenikwa, we have reached 24534 people in 2017 exposing them to environmentally friendly practices and issues facing our wildlife in South Africa. This represents a 6.49% increase from 2016 to 2017 in visitors support.

2018 and the way forward

At the heart of Tenikwa’s philosophy lies a balance between providing a meaningful guest experience which imparts a conservation message whilst providing a sustainable form of funding for the rehabilitation associated activities of the organisation through tourism. The objectives of Tenikwa are carried out by a dedicated team of 31 permanent staff members. This inextricably ties us to the fluctuating and ever-changing demands in the tourism industry, with factors sometimes beyond our control which affect the flow of tourists into The Garden Route. We will need to become more buoyant in terms of cost management and more efficient in terms of our internal processes, and we expect 2018 to be a year of regrouping, assessing our tourist offering and ensuring that our focus remains on making a material difference to the wildlife along The Garden Route.

Responsible Tourism Report

Annual Sustainable Report

2016

Tenikwa Wildlife Awareness Centre, through the very nature of its being, strives to raise awareness of the environmental impact humans have to nature, and to provide information to guests, local communities and organisations on environmentally responsible practices.

In 2011, Tenikwa embarked on an informal program to “put into practice what it preached” through ensuring that the impact of the business on the environment was understood and measures taken to reduce the impact where possible.

In 2012, Tenikwa formalised its journey towards measurability of its sustainability by becoming members of HeritageSA, and through the Greenline Program,  underwent a self-assessment and subsequent audit of its business processes, acquiring Silver-level accreditation status.

2014 saw us consolidating our activities and taking stock of what our core objectives are and where we should be placing our focus. Some ineffective programs were discontinued and we launched the successful EcoKidz Family Challenge which has had great acceptance in the marketplace, delivering a value-added product with specific conservation objectives and geared towards the family with 7-12 age group children.

In 2015, we re-assessed the effectiveness of our community engagement to achieve our objectives of encouraging a behavioural change in lifestyle to a more environmentally-sensitive way of living. We made significant strides towards reducing our energy consumption and focused on integrating rehabilitation awareness into our general awareness programs. Our overall conservation efforts and holistic approach to supporting biodiversity have been recognised in various spheres.

2016 saw a concerted effort to upgrading our rehabilitation facilities with the complete overhaul of our marine pool and adapting our facilities to the changing conservation needs of The Garden Route.  We completed the conversion of our lighting systems to LED throughout the property and we improved our rainwater holding capacity significantly.  We also upgraded several enclosures to use the Awareness Centre more effectively to deliver messages of modern day use of technology in non-lethal methods of predator management. Working closely with other conservation stakeholders, we focused on increasing the awareness of our wildlife rehabilitation facility to ensure that animals in need are brought to the centre as soon and as efficiently as possible to afford maximum chance of recovery and release.

Energy Management

The conversion of all lights to the energy efficient LED bulbs has been completed throughout the property.  All desktop computers where possible have been converted to laptops which draw less electricity. Whilst the spend, year on year is more, initiatives to reduce usage has mitigated against rising cost of electricity (17% increase) as well as an increased need for heating in the rehabilitation centre which is a high energy department.

2014 Spend         R67,524                2015 Spend         R59,249                2016 Spend         R73, 377               % Increase 23%

Waste Management

Tenikwa was one of the major sponsors of the Kurland Recycle Swop Shop, not only providing  items for the shop to offer in exchange for recyclable waste, but also providing recyclable waste for the shop to sell in order to buy swop items.  Sadly towards the latter part of the year, we saw a decline in the management of the project and although we remain fully committed to the concept of the project, we need to reassess our involvement in this project in 2017.

Water Management

Tenikwa has significantly increased our rainwater storage capacity and converted the Awareness Centre on to rainwater.  Several dams have also been cleared of papyrus which was choking the water systems. The Marine Pool area has been completely overhauled with the lining of the penguin pool. This will allow more efficient water filtration and reduce the need to change the water too often. The pool was also found to have a major crack and this has been repaired reducing water loss.

Community Engagement

In 2016, Tenikwa approached key conservation stakeholders in the area and ran several workshops on Handling Dangerous Animals as well as a First Responder Workshop providing information on how to deal with injured wildlife out in the field. A simple public guide to dealing with injured wildlife was printed and issued, covering the main species found along The Garden Route.  We also engaged with CapeNature to install signage on beach points along the Garden Route with emergency numbers for injured wildlife.  The renovation of our penguin pool allowed for a great opportunity to engage with the local school and the children from nearby Kurland village workshopped Problems facing our wildlife, Solutions, and The Perfect World.  Under Art for Change supervision, the children then interpreted the workshop onto the penguin pool walls in the form of a fascinating, detailed mural. Several workshops were held with members of various conservancies to talk about the golden hours when a wild animal is injured and the necessity to get it to proper care as soon as possible.

Rehabilitation Highlights

Tenikwa is a member of the Population Reinforcement Working Group for the endangered African Penguin and has contributed to several initiatives from the African Penguin Biodiversity Management Plan, one of which is the Norms and Standards for keeping marine species in captivity for rehabilitation purposes. Coincidentally a week after stakeholder training on First Responder, we were called out to an emergency situation when a flock of flamingos collided with power lines. Amidst devastating and fatal injuries, Tenikwa managed to rehabilitate and release some of the flamingos proving that collaboration between conservation stakeholders is the key to maintaining biodiversity in the area.  2016 also saw a dramatic increase in the number of turtle hatchlings washing up along The Garden Route with Tenikwa providing the main stabilisation facility prior to their transfer to Two Oceans Aquarium for further rehabilitation.  Tenikwa was proud to accept an award from Birdlife SA for our contribution to conservation. Towards the latter part of the year, Tenikwa employed a full time veterinary assistant.

Conservation Awareness

Tenikwa was once again a finalist in the Lilizella Awards for Wildlife Experiences and continues to receive an excellent rating on TripAdvisor through guests recognising the conservation work we do on the ground, as well as offering a professional  product.  In 2016, as the newly introduced lions matured, this part of the standard tour became an excellent platform to raise awareness of the unethical use of lions in the tourism and hunting industry, and we also upgraded our caracal enclosure significantly to incorporate awareness of the use of technology in the farming industry for ethical livestock management. Throughout our guest experiences, and our engagement with the tourist trade, we continue to promote our holistic approach to ethical wildlife tourism, relooking at the industry and emerging trends and adapting our offering where necessary.

Voluntourism

Tenikwa partnered with Edu-Eco to offer a Predi-Cat eco-learning experience at Tenikwa which has been attended by several students and has allowed us to assess the voluntourism market to ascertain what aspects would be suitable to the Tenikwa environment. Several veterinary students also spent time at Tenikwa, gaining experience in the rehabilitation of wild animals, and being introduced to sound animal husbandry methodology in the captive wildlife environment.

2017 and the way forward

Tenikwa is well positioned to move into 2017 with the prospects of new products and several new conservation initiatives on the horizon.  Due to the changing needs of rehabilitation along The Garden Route as well as our desire to continually improve our rehabilitation facilities, the wildlife hospital will undergo further enhancements with the hope of raising sufficient funds to install Xray facilities on-site to assist in the prognosis of injured birds. Tenikwa will also be contributing to the new African Penguin Biodiversity Management Plan which is due to be formulated in 2017. We look forward to a successful 2017 demonstrating once again how ethical wildlife tourism can directly contribute to conservation and support biodiversity.

Annual Sustainable Report

2015

Tenikwa Wildlife Awareness Centre, through the very nature of its being, strives to raise awareness of the environmental impact humans have to nature, and to provide information to guests, local communities and organisations on environmentally responsible practices.

In 2011, Tenikwa embarked on an informal program to “put into practice what it preached” through ensuring that the impact of the business on the environment was understood, and measures are taken to reduce the impact where possible.

In 2012, Tenikwa formalised its journey towards measurability of its sustainability by becoming members of HeritageSA, and through the Greenline Program, underwent a self-assessment and subsequent audit of its business processes, acquiring Silver-level accreditation status.

2014 saw us consolidating our activities and taking stock of what our core objectives are and where we should be placing our focus.  Some ineffective programs were discontinued and we launched the successful EcoKidz Family Challenge which has had great acceptance in the marketplace delivering a value-added product with specific conservation objectives and geared towards the family with 7-12 year old children.

In 2015, we re-assessed the effectiveness of our community engagement to achieve our objectives of encouraging a behavioural change in lifestyle to a more environmentally-sensitive way of living. We made significant strides towards reducing our energy consumption and focused on integrating rehabilitation awareness into our general awareness programs. Our overall conservation efforts and holistic approach to supporting biodiversity have been recognised in various spheres.

Energy Management

Our penguin pool filtration system has now been converted over to operate on alternative energy with voltaric panels and a specialised pump which runs directly from energy produced by the panels. All lighting in our Awareness Centre, offices and rehabilitation facilities have been converted over to LED lighting. These initiatives have resulted in a significant reduction in electricity usage and costs.

The figures below do not take into account an average 15% increase in the cost of Eskom electricity

2014 spend R67,524 2015 spend R59,249 % Reduction 12 %

 

Waste Management

An exciting project within the Kurland Village community was the start of a Recycle Swop Shop where members of the community can exchange household recyclable waste for essential commodities. We immediately saw the potential of this project in furthering our objective of incentivized behavioural change and approached the owner of the shop to offer our assistance. Tenikwa assists the Recyle Swop Shop through our Pack For A Purpose Initiative as well as sending our recyclable waste to the centre so that they can benefit from the waste and buy items to stock the shop. In 2015, Tenikwa provided the Recycle Swop Shop with 3234,38kgs of recyclable product, broken down as follows:

Paper 1629,64kgs Plastic 897,59kg Tins & Glass 707,15kg

 

Tenikwa took part in a Recycle Expo which presented Recycling ideas to the local community. The workshop was well received and has done much to raise awareness of what can be done with ordinary household waste.

Tenikwa has also become one of the major sponsors behind a community Gardening Club which promotes the love of horticulture within Kurland Village. Tenikwa sponsored two loads of compost for the gardeners to prepare their gardens for planting and arranged for a demonstration on the benefits of worm farming. Tenikwa sponsored two cash prizes in the Annual Gardens Competition during which the gardens were assessed for various criteria including environmentally friendly gardening techniques and the incorporation of indigenous water-wise species.

Water Management

2015 and early 2016 highlighted the devastating drought which is engulfing central South Africa. We are fortunate to have experienced a generous rainfall, but have installed additional rainwater catchment tanks and have added roofing to the penguin pool which also catches water for our wildlife rehabilitation facilities.

A constant battle is to maintain the clarity and filtration of the penguin pool using products that are not harmful to the environment or our penguins. We have made some advances with this, but it appears to be an on-going challenge to balance health and environment with asthetics of a sparkling clear pool.

Community Engagement

Tenikwa provides a wildlife rehabilitation facility for res nullius animals and birds along The Garden Route who are abandoned, injured or in need of veterinary care. Assistance and advice is provided to the community who are dealing with damage causing animals. Our website has been redeveloped with the emphasis on providing information, guidance and direction for various human-wildlife conflict situations as well as advice for people encountering injured wildlife. Tenikwa ran a project towards the end of the year to raise funds to buy a Christmas Present for each child at the Come To Learn Creche and guests were invited to become involved in supporting this project. The end of year party for the Come To Learn Creche was sponsored by Tenikwa and each child received a gift-wrapped present to put under their Christmas Tree.

The Pack For A Purpose initiative was well supported by our guests during the year with several donations towards our community projects being received and a total of 61.26 kgs of donated items received and delivered to Come To Learn Creche, Kurland School and The Recycle Swop Shop, as well as some donations towards our wildlife hospital.

Tenikwa met with the committee of the Tsitsi Tuiniers community gardening club to find out how we could support the club in their efforts to encourage horticulture in Kurland Village. Through this engagement, we provided financial assistance for certain projects and arranged a talk on worm farming and sponsored two prizes for the annual gardens competition.

Our involvement in the Recycle Swop Shop has assisted the shop to have “exchangable” essential every-day household goods available as well as school stationery. Tenikwa also donated several Mathematical Colouring-In Books to the shop which were well received by the children of the area.

Rehabilitation Facility Highlights

In total, Tenikwa admitted 240 wild animals for rehabilitation. Tenikwa receives no government funding for the costs associated with the subsequent care of these animals and maintenance of the rehabilitation facilities. At considerable cost, these animals are treated, cared for by our staff and veterinary team, and every effort is made to ensure their successful return to the wild. We do this with passion, compassion and a high level of commitment to what we believe in. Some memorable releases in 2015 include the rehabilitation and release of a young Crowned Eagle, 8 tiny Loggerhead Turtles suffering from cold-stunning, who were stabilised at Tenikwa and with the support of CemAir, flown down to TwoOceans Aquarium for further rehabilitation.

In 2015, we launched a sponsorship program for the sponsoring of high care kennels in our rehabilitation facility for a monthly sum. We have received several sponsorships to-date and these together with several kind donations have allowed us to improve and upgrade the facility. With the assistance of Offshore Adventures, we were able to complete a new Seal Stabilisation Enclosure.

Tenikwa has had on-going involvement with the first National Biodiversity Management Plan for African Penguins since the initial meeting in Cape Town in 2010 and all organisations committed to African Penguin Conservation are deeply involved in carrying out the initiatives identified to save the African Penguin from extinction.

In 2015, we also looked at forging closer relationships with other conservation organisations to further common goals. We now have an arrangement in place with Birdlife Plett members to collect birds needing rehabilitation in Plett and transport them to Tenikwa. Mark Brown from Natures Valley Trust rings the birds ready for release as part of their research programs and as always we work closely with SANCCOB who carry out the final rehabilitation and release of all penguins received at Tenikwa.

As part of new welfare legislation, Tenikwa Rehabilitation Centre is now registered with the South African Veterinary Council.

Conservation Awareness

2015 was indeed a milestone year when our holistic approach to ethical wildlife tourism was recognised by Tenikwa being voted as the Top Wildlife Experience in the Western Cape through the Lilizella Awards run by South African Tourism. We also were recognised on TripAdvisor Hall of Fame for Excellent Rating for 5 years running which is a significant constant achievement. As always, our tourist offering is grounded in our conservation objectives and a complete review of our signage and information displays was conducted and upgraded.

2016 and towards the future

Tenikwa is in its 10th year of operation as an Awareness Centre and we still continue to innovate and move with the changing conservation issues facing our wildlife in South Africa. We have identified several areas where we can improve the effectiveness and dissemination of information to our guests and will be embarking on some structural improvements during the course of the year. We will also continue to improve and upgrade our rehabilitation facilities with further improvements to our high care area as we gain sponsors for kennels and develop some more species specific rehabilitation facilities identified.   We also hope to launch the Predi-Cat Eco-Learning program on animal husbandry and behaviour. We have identified several first responder citizens and organisations and will be providing training so that injured animals can be recovered quickly and appropriately with the goal of admitting and treating as soon as possible. We have also identified the need to improve our rainwater catchment further and continue to reduce our electricity consumption. We look forward to a successful 2016 demonstrating once again how ethical wildlife tourism can directly contribute to conservation and supporting biodiversity.

Annual Sustainable Report

2015

Tenikwa Wildlife Awareness Centre, through the very nature of its being, strives to raise awareness of the environmental impact humans have to nature, and to provide information to guests, local communities and organisations on environmentally responsible practices.

In 2011, Tenikwa embarked on an informal program to “put into practice what it preached” through ensuring that the impact of the business on the environment was understood, and measures are taken to reduce the impact where possible.

In 2012, Tenikwa formalised its journey towards measurability of its sustainability by becoming members of HeritageSA, and through the Greenline Program, underwent a self-assessment and subsequent audit of its business processes, acquiring Silver-level accreditation status.

2014 saw us consolidating our activities and taking stock of what our core objectives are and where we should be placing our focus.  Some ineffective programs were discontinued and we launched the successful EcoKidz Family Challenge which has had great acceptance in the marketplace delivering a value-added product with specific conservation objectives and geared towards the family with 7-12 year old children.

In 2015, we re-assessed the effectiveness of our community engagement to achieve our objectives of encouraging a behavioural change in lifestyle to a more environmentally-sensitive way of living. We made significant strides towards reducing our energy consumption and focused on integrating rehabilitation awareness into our general awareness programs. Our overall conservation efforts and holistic approach to supporting biodiversity have been recognised in various spheres.

Energy Management

Our penguin pool filtration system has now been converted over to operate on alternative energy with voltaric panels and a specialised pump which runs directly from energy produced by the panels. All lighting in our Awareness Centre, offices and rehabilitation facilities have been converted over to LED lighting. These initiatives have resulted in a significant reduction in electricity usage and costs.

The figures below do not take into account an average 15% increase in the cost of Eskom electricity

2014 spend R67,524 2015 spend R59,249 % Reduction 12 %

 

Waste Management

An exciting project within the Kurland Village community was the start of a Recycle Swop Shop where members of the community can exchange household recyclable waste for essential commodities. We immediately saw the potential of this project in furthering our objective of incentivized behavioural change and approached the owner of the shop to offer our assistance. Tenikwa assists the Recyle Swop Shop through our Pack For A Purpose Initiative as well as sending our recyclable waste to the centre so that they can benefit from the waste and buy items to stock the shop. In 2015, Tenikwa provided the Recycle Swop Shop with 3234,38kgs of recyclable product, broken down as follows:

Paper 1629,64kgs Plastic 897,59kg Tins & Glass 707,15kg

 

Tenikwa took part in a Recycle Expo which presented Recycling ideas to the local community. The workshop was well received and has done much to raise awareness of what can be done with ordinary household waste.

Tenikwa has also become one of the major sponsors behind a community Gardening Club which promotes the love of horticulture within Kurland Village. Tenikwa sponsored two loads of compost for the gardeners to prepare their gardens for planting and arranged for a demonstration on the benefits of worm farming. Tenikwa sponsored two cash prizes in the Annual Gardens Competition during which the gardens were assessed for various criteria including environmentally friendly gardening techniques and the incorporation of indigenous water-wise species.

Water Management

2015 and early 2016 highlighted the devastating drought which is engulfing central South Africa. We are fortunate to have experienced a generous rainfall, but have installed additional rainwater catchment tanks and have added roofing to the penguin pool which also catches water for our wildlife rehabilitation facilities.

A constant battle is to maintain the clarity and filtration of the penguin pool using products that are not harmful to the environment or our penguins. We have made some advances with this, but it appears to be an on-going challenge to balance health and environment with asthetics of a sparkling clear pool.

Community Engagement

Tenikwa provides a wildlife rehabilitation facility for res nullius animals and birds along The Garden Route who are abandoned, injured or in need of veterinary care. Assistance and advice is provided to the community who are dealing with damage causing animals. Our website has been redeveloped with the emphasis on providing information, guidance and direction for various human-wildlife conflict situations as well as advice for people encountering injured wildlife. Tenikwa ran a project towards the end of the year to raise funds to buy a Christmas Present for each child at the Come To Learn Creche and guests were invited to become involved in supporting this project. The end of year party for the Come To Learn Creche was sponsored by Tenikwa and each child received a gift-wrapped present to put under their Christmas Tree.

The Pack For A Purpose initiative was well supported by our guests during the year with several donations towards our community projects being received and a total of 61.26 kgs of donated items received and delivered to Come To Learn Creche, Kurland School and The Recycle Swop Shop, as well as some donations towards our wildlife hospital.

Tenikwa met with the committee of the Tsitsi Tuiniers community gardening club to find out how we could support the club in their efforts to encourage horticulture in Kurland Village. Through this engagement, we provided financial assistance for certain projects and arranged a talk on worm farming and sponsored two prizes for the annual gardens competition.

Our involvement in the Recycle Swop Shop has assisted the shop to have “exchangable” essential every-day household goods available as well as school stationery. Tenikwa also donated several Mathematical Colouring-In Books to the shop which were well received by the children of the area.

Rehabilitation Facility Highlights

In total, Tenikwa admitted 240 wild animals for rehabilitation. Tenikwa receives no government funding for the costs associated with the subsequent care of these animals and maintenance of the rehabilitation facilities. At considerable cost, these animals are treated, cared for by our staff and veterinary team, and every effort is made to ensure their successful return to the wild. We do this with passion, compassion and a high level of commitment to what we believe in. Some memorable releases in 2015 include the rehabilitation and release of a young Crowned Eagle, 8 tiny Loggerhead Turtles suffering from cold-stunning, who were stabilised at Tenikwa and with the support of CemAir, flown down to TwoOceans Aquarium for further rehabilitation.

In 2015, we launched a sponsorship program for the sponsoring of high care kennels in our rehabilitation facility for a monthly sum. We have received several sponsorships to-date and these together with several kind donations have allowed us to improve and upgrade the facility. With the assistance of Offshore Adventures, we were able to complete a new Seal Stabilisation Enclosure.

Tenikwa has had on-going involvement with the first National Biodiversity Management Plan for African Penguins since the initial meeting in Cape Town in 2010 and all organisations committed to African Penguin Conservation are deeply involved in carrying out the initiatives identified to save the African Penguin from extinction.

In 2015, we also looked at forging closer relationships with other conservation organisations to further common goals. We now have an arrangement in place with Birdlife Plett members to collect birds needing rehabilitation in Plett and transport them to Tenikwa. Mark Brown from Natures Valley Trust rings the birds ready for release as part of their research programs and as always we work closely with SANCCOB who carry out the final rehabilitation and release of all penguins received at Tenikwa.

As part of new welfare legislation, Tenikwa Rehabilitation Centre is now registered with the South African Veterinary Council.

Conservation Awareness

2015 was indeed a milestone year when our holistic approach to ethical wildlife tourism was recognised by Tenikwa being voted as the Top Wildlife Experience in the Western Cape through the Lilizella Awards run by South African Tourism. We also were recognised on TripAdvisor Hall of Fame for Excellent Rating for 5 years running which is a significant constant achievement. As always, our tourist offering is grounded in our conservation objectives and a complete review of our signage and information displays was conducted and upgraded.

2016 and towards the future

Tenikwa is in its 10th year of operation as an Awareness Centre and we still continue to innovate and move with the changing conservation issues facing our wildlife in South Africa. We have identified several areas where we can improve the effectiveness and dissemination of information to our guests and will be embarking on some structural improvements during the course of the year. We will also continue to improve and upgrade our rehabilitation facilities with further improvements to our high care area as we gain sponsors for kennels and develop some more species specific rehabilitation facilities identified.   We also hope to launch the Predi-Cat Eco-Learning program on animal husbandry and behaviour. We have identified several first responder citizens and organisations and will be providing training so that injured animals can be recovered quickly and appropriately with the goal of admitting and treating as soon as possible. We have also identified the need to improve our rainwater catchment further and continue to reduce our electricity consumption. We look forward to a successful 2016 demonstrating once again how ethical wildlife tourism can directly contribute to conservation and supporting biodiversity.

Annual Sustainable Tourism Report

2014

Tenikwa Wildlife Awareness Centre, through the very nature of its being, strives to raise awareness of the environmental impact humans have to nature, and to provide information to guests, local communities and organisations on environmentally responsible practices.

In 2011, Tenikwa embarked on an informal program to “put into practice what it preached” through ensuring that the impact of the business on the environment was understood, and measures are taken to reduce the impact where possible.

In 2012, Tenikwa formalised its journey towards measurability of its sustainability by becoming members of HeritageSA, and through the Greenline Program, underwent a self-assessment and subsequent audit of its business processes, acquiring Silver-level accreditation status.

2014 saw us consolidating our activities and taking stock of what our core objectives are and where we should be placing our focus.  Some ineffective programs were discontinued and we launched the successful EcoKidz Family Challenge which has had great acceptance in the marketplace delivering a value-added product with specific conservation objectives and geared towards the family with 7-12 year old children.

Energy Management

One of our key objectives in 2014 was to raise sufficient funds to be able to convert our Penguin Splash Pool which is used for Marine Conservation Awareness as well as recuperating marine species such as the recently upgraded Endangered African Penguin and the Cape Gannet classified as Vulnerable in the IUCN Red Data Listing. The swimming pool pumps and filtration system has been identified as one of our resource intensive items.  Through public donations and cost savings in other areas, we have saved sufficient funds to embark on this alternative energy project in 2015.

Waste Management

Difficulties have been experienced in ensuring that separated waste is diverted to a recycling plant when the Bitou Recycling Plant shut down.  All waste is now sent to the municipal dump where it is sorted and processed.  For our part, we separate and trust that the municipality will be committed to recycling to the best of their ability and current constraints. Whilst this continues to be a situation which frustrates us in our desire to effectively separate and recycle, we have now made contact with a local entrepeneur who is recycling cooldrink cans, and our cans are now being collected by him to support his project.  We were very happy to hear of the Recycle Swop Shop opening in Kurland Village in late 2014 and have made a commitment to assist this initiative by providing items for the Swop Shop to exchange for recyclable goods collected by the local community. Not only does this initiative encourage recycling, it has many benefits such as cleaning up the environment; village, providing useful items for the home, netting in the children into the programme , but also more importantly it does not support “The Handout” syndrome which we have found to be ineffective in changing people’s behaviours. Since we are part of the Pack For A Purpose Initiative, our guests will also be involved in the Recycle Swop Shop by bringing useful items, stationery and second hand clothing along when they visit Tenikwa.

With the implementation of the new EcoKidz Family Challenge, focus has been placed on the key values of an EcoKid, namely :

* To respect animals

* To protect animals spaces, and habitats

* To reduce pollution by re-using and recycling

* To share our knowledge with others

A correlation between animals, the environment and the impacts of pollution are key themes within the EcoKidz program.

Water Management

During 2014, Tenikwa continued with the implementation of our Alien Management Plan to control and manage alien infestations on the property. Specific reliable local entrepeneurs from the community have been given permission to cut wood on the property for firewood. Additional water tanks have been installed. Only environmentally friendly products are used in our Penguin Splash Pool.

Community Impact

Tenikwa provides a free wildlife rehabilitation service to the community and nature conservation bodies within the region. We accept some 230 birds and animals into our rehabilitation centre each year. In 2014 we admitted 233 animals and birds into our rehabilitation centre, giving these displaced animals the maximum chance of returning to the wild. Several presentations on Conservation Awareness was also done. Through our responsible tourism purchasing policies implemented, Tenikwa has a good supply of local curios for our curio shop, and purchasing patterns are analysed to purchase locally where feasible and where it makes good business sense. Tenikwa employs 21 permanent staff members with the vast majority living in and around the area of The Crags where unemployment levels are high. Tenikwa has a very low-key volunteer/intern program which focuses on veterinary and animal science students, allowing a small number to volunteer at Tenikwa primarily in the rehabilitation centre to gain experience on sound rehabilitation protocols. These are skilled volunteers who do not interfere with permanent job opportunities at Tenikwa since we believe that employment and job creation is fundamental to conservation.

Developments and the future

We look forward to 2015 with renewed energy and the funds being available to implement some of the projects which have been identified. A new position of Conservation Manager has been created and this position will be filled at 1st April 2015. Some of the projects we have identified are the conversion of the Penguin Splash Pool to alternative energy, creation and upgrading of specialised rehabiltiation enclosures, overhaul of our information signage, improved filtration on our Penguin Splash Pool. We are also involved in working closely with Natures Valley Trust NGO on a project to identify environmental training needs for stakeholders in the area.

Annual Sustainable Tourism Report

2013

Tenikwa Wildlife Awareness Centre, through the very nature of its being, strives to raise awareness of the environmental impact humans have to nature, and to provide information to guests, local communities and organisations on environmentally responsible practices.

In 2011, Tenikwa embarked on an informal program to “put into practice what it preached” through ensuring that the impact of the business on the environment was understood, and measures are taken to reduce the impact where possible.

In 2012, Tenikwa formalised its journey towards measurability of its sustainability by becoming members of HeritageSA, and through the Greenline Program, underwent a self-assessment and subsequent audit of its business processes, acquiring Silver-level accreditation status.

Energy Management

During 2013 with the escalating costs of Eskom, Energy Management became a focal point where energy consumption is monitored on a monthly basis, and spikes in usage analysed.  Funds have not been available to convert the energy-intensive pool pumps required for the Penguin Rehabilitation Facilities to solar, but a renewed effort in 2014 will attempt to raise sufficient funds to make this costly conversion.

Waste Management

Difficulties have been experienced in ensuring that separated waste is diverted to a recycling plant when the Bitou Recycling Plant shut down.  All waste is now sent to the municipal dump where it is sorted and processed.  For our part, we separate and trust that the municipality will be committed to recycling to the best of their ability and current constraints.

With the implementation of the new EcoKidz Family Challenge, focus has been placed on the key values of an EcoKid, namely :

* To respect animals

* To protect animals spaces, and habitats

* To reduce pollution by re-using and recycling

* To share our knowledge with others

A correlation between animals, the environment and the impacts of pollution are key themes within the EcoKidz program.

Water Management

During 2013, the following Water Management initiatives were continued

  1. Awareness Posters are displayed in all toilets at Tenikwa as part of the awareness campaign.
  2. Leaking taps and pipes have been addressed
  3. Tenikwa is doing Alien Clearing every three weeks.
  4. Forage for the primates is collected on a daily basis and this includes some invasive species such as Black Wattle which the primates relish.
  5. We have also given permission to selected community individuals to collect firewood from gum and wattle on the property.

Tenikwa has enlisted the assistance of “Work for Water” through the Crags Conservancy to assist with Alien Clearing in the various zones identified.

Community Impact

Tenikwa provides a free wildlife rehabilitation service to the community and Nature Conservation organisations within the region. Through the new purchasing policies implemented, Tenikwa has increased the stock of local curios in the curio shop, and purchasing patterns are now being analysed to purchase locally where feasible and where it makes good business sense.

Developments and the future

2014 is a year for taking stock at Tenikwa and getting back to basics and sticking to what we do best.  We will revisit all areas of implementation to ensure that protocols identified are being carried through and re-implement procedures where they are found to be lacking.

Annual Sustainable Tourism Report

2012

Tenikwa Wildlife Awareness Centre, through the very nature of its being, strives to raise awareness of the environmental impact humans have to nature, and to provide information to guests, local communities and organisations on environmentally responsible practices.

In 2011, Tenikwa embarked on an informal program to “put into practice what it preaches” through ensuring that the impact of the business on the environment is understood, and measures are taken to reduce the impact where possible.

Challenges that have been faced during the implementation of the program have been identified, and steady progress has been made.  The key challenges faced include

  1. Reluctance and resistance to change.  For example, a basic lack of understanding amongst the staff as to the reasons for recycling became apparent with our efforts to formalize our recycling initiatives.
  2. Cost of introducing change.  With the downturn of economy, as well as an escalation of rehabilitation expenses,  the cost of implementing some of the initiatives has been a prohibiting factor.  Tenikwa carries the extra burden of funding the rehabilitation activities of the centre which bears heavily on available resources for projects.

Addressing the challenges has provided opportunity for raising awareness of sound sustainable practices, and forced Tenikwa to look at its expenses in an effort to ensure that unnecessary expenses are curtailed and some quick wins are achieved.  The more expensive projects will need to be budgeted for.

Energy Management

During 2012, the following Energy Management Initiatives were implemented:

  1. Low energy bulbs have been purchased and placed in the new Baboon Awareness Center that officially opened up in December 2012
  2. Unnecessary switching on of lights has been monitored.
  3. Use of heaters in the hospital has been stopped as a fire place has been installed to reduce energy consumption.
  4. Energy consumption is now monitored on a monthly basis.
  5. The Penguin Pool pumps have been monitored closely and we are in the process of sourcing additional funding for solar power panels as we are trying to reduce energy consumption…

Waste Management

During 2012, the following Waste Management Initiatives were implemented :

  1. Tenikwas worm farm is being maintained on a daily basis
  2. The use of Leopard  feces as a non-lethal method of predator and baboon control has been implemented and the feces is provided to the community free of charge.
  3. A drive to recycle waste has been implemented with several recycling stations set up.
  4. Recycle Posters have been placed in our new awareness corner that has been established in our curio shop and where it is easily observed by our guests
  5. Recycled and non-recyclable waste is now monitored on a weekly basis.

Water Management

During 2012, the following Water Management initiatives were implemented

  1. There was a water tank installed near the hospital to reduce the usage of water.
  2. Awareness Posters have been placed in all toilets at Tenikwa as part of the awareness campaign.
  3. Tenikwa is doing Alien Clearing every three weeks.

Community Impact

Tenikwa also provides a free wildlife rehabilitation service to the community and Nature Conservation organisations within the region.  Through the new purchasing policies implemented, Tenikwa has increased the stock of local curios in the curio shop, and purchasing patterns are now being analysed to purchase locally where feasible and where it makes business sense.

Tenikwa is currently working on awareness in schools as there have been several presentations at the various schools like, Bayside College, Christian High School, Wittedrift High as well as Greenwood Primary… We are education the public on how important it is to save our environment.

Developments and the future

On the 17 April 2012, Tenikwa received a “Silver Classification” and this has been a great achievement as in 2011 Tenikwa was only a “Bronze Classification”…

We will however, try to achieve a “Gold Classification” in the near future.

Annual Sustainable Tourism Report

2011

Tenikwa Wildlife Awareness Centre, through the very nature of its being, strives to raise awareness of the environmental impact humans have to nature, and to provide information to guests, local communities and organisations on environmentally responsible practices.

In 2011, Tenikwa embarked on an informal program to “put into practice what it preaches” through ensuring that the impact of the business on the environment is understood, and measures are taken to reduce the impact where possible.

Challenges that have been faced during the implementation of the program have been identified, and steady progress has been made.  The key challenges faced include

  1. Reluctance and resistance to change.  For example, a basic lack of understanding amongst the staff as to the reasons for recycling became apparent with our efforts to formalize our recycling initiatives.
  2. Cost of introducing change.  With the downturn of economy, as well as an escalation of rehabilitation expenses,  the cost of implementing some of the initiatives has been a prohibiting factor.  Tenikwa carries the extra burden of funding the rehabilitation activities of the centre which bears heavily on available resources for projects.

Addressing the challenges has provided opportunity for raising awareness of sound sustainable practices, and forced Tenikwa to look at its expenses in an effort to ensure that unnecessary expenses are curtailed and some quick wins are achieved.  The more expensive projects will need to be budgeted for.

Policy Changes

Management has implemented some policy changes with regard to the following:

  1. Ensuring that products sold in the curio shop conform to IFAW recommendations wrt trade in wild animal parts.  Although Tenikwa has always avoided certain curio items, such as porcupine quills, buying is now strictly monitored and choice of supplier is also evaluated on their supply ethics.
  2. During 2011, a sustainable environmental policy was incorporated into Tenikwa’s Policies and Procedures
  3. The concept of “Buy local” and supporting community crafts has been incorporated into Tenikwa’s Purchasing Policy.
  4. Tenikwa updated the Employment Policy to look towards sourcing staff from local communities where possible.

Energy Management

During 2011, the following Energy Management Initiatives were implemented:

  1. Low energy bulbs have replaced conventional electrical bulbs for lighting.
  2. Solar installations have been implemented for security, gate automation, heating in certain enclosures, electrification of certain enclosures
  3. The use of the solar cooker in the Teagarden has been encouraged as an awareness initiative but also as a staff education project.  Performance evaluation of Teagarden staff include proactive use of the solar cooker.
  4. Unnecessary switching on of lights has been monitored.
  5. Use of heaters in the hospital has been monitored.
  6. Energy consumption is now monitored on a monthly basis.

Waste Management

During 2011, the following Waste Management Initiatives were implemented :

  1. Several more worm farms were created in order to cope with biodegradable waste from Tenikwa.
  2. The use of Leopard, Cheetah and Caracal feces as a non-lethal method of predator and baboon control has been implemented and the feces is provided to the community free of charge.
  3. A drive to recycle waste has been implemented with several recycling stations set up.
  4. A food-chain has been established for recoverable waste.
  5. Chicken waste is now frozen down and provided free of charge at the monthly pet care clinic at Kurland Village.
  6. Recycle Posters have been placed in all toilets as part of the awareness campaign.
  7. The Penguin Splash Pool Pictogram has been updated to reflect all kinds of pollution which impact Penguin populations.
  8. Recycled and non-recyclable waste is now monitored on a weekly basis.

Water Management

During 2011, the following Water Management initiatives were implemented :

  1. An Osmosis system was installed at the centre in order to produce drinkable water from the water pipeline which services the facility.
  2. Plans have been drawn to install more water tanks in the hospital.
  3. Awareness Posters have been placed in all toilets at Tenikwa as part of the awareness campaign.
  4. Tenikwa developed and formalised an Alien Management Plan.

Community Impact

Tenikwa continues to provide a free monthly pet-care clinic in Kurland Village, and chicken waste is now provided as free food at the clinic to pet owners who bring their dogs for a checkup.  Tenikwa also provides a free wildlife rehabilitation service to the community and Nature Conservation organisations within the region.  Through the new purchasing policies implemented, Tenikwa has increased the stock of local curios in the curio shop, and purchasing patterns are now being analysed to purchase locally where feasible and where it makes business sense.

Developments and the future

Towards the end of 2011, Tenikwa took the decision to formalize their sustainable tourism program and joined Greenline for accreditation as a sustainable tourism entity.  An initial assessment showed that Tenikwa has come a long way in implementing its strategy, but there still remains some projects which are needed to achieve accreditation.  These, together with implementing further monitoring efforts will form the bulk of activities identified for the forthcoming year with the objective of achieving accreditation during 2012.